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This appendix provides a glossary of the different kinds of plans.

Air Space Plan

An air space plan is a volumetric description of a parcel prepared by a British Columbia land surveyor based on information about elevations. See s. 138 of the Land Title Act.

Block Outline Survey

In some circumstances (for example, where land is undergoing construction and where there is a risk that posts and other monumentation will be destroyed), the Surveyor General allows a surveyor to complete a survey that does not comply with the Surveyor General’s usual requirements for posting every parcel in a subdivision. However, the Surveyor General sets a time within which the surveyor must make a final posting of the parcels. A British Columbia land surveyor prepares a block outline survey. See s. 69 of the Land Title Act.

Composite Plan

A composite plan is literally a composite of deposited plans or other records in the land title office which gives an overall view or overlay of a large area. The Surveyor General assists in the preparation of a composite plan whenever their office can provide that service. A British Columbia land surveyor does not have to prepare a composite plan. See s. 71 of the Land Title Act.

Explanatory Plan

Section 1 of the Land Title Act defines “explanatory plan” as:

  • a plan that
  • (a) is not based on a survey but on existing descriptions, plans or records of the land title office, and
  • (b) is certified correct in accordance with the records of the land title office by a British Columbia land surveyor or by
    • (i) a person designated under section 121(7) of the Forest Act for the purposes of that section, or
    • (ii) the minister charged with the administration of the Transportation Act.

Section 99 of the Act sets out when the registrar accepts an explanatory plan.

Posting Plan

A British Columbia land surveyor prepares a posting plan which shows the posts or pins set out in the ground. Under s. 68(4) of the Land Title Act, “[t]he acceptance by the registrar of a posting plan for filing is not a determination by the registrar as to the location of the boundaries of the parcel posted”.

Public Official Plan

A public official plan is a plan of Crown land, prepared by a British Columbia land surveyor, which the Surveyor General deposits at the registrar’s request. The public official plan complements an existing description in a Crown grant or a plan attached to a Crown grant. It provides dimensions and bearings not contained in the Crown grant. See s. 59 of the Land Title Act.

Reference Plan

A reference plan is based on a ground survey done by a British Columbia land surveyor and generally refers to a single parcel. See ss. 67 and 99 of the Land Title Act.

Sketch Plan

Section 1 of the Act defines a sketch plan as “an adequately dimensioned drawing of the area affected by a lease of all or part of a building located on land shown on a plan of survey deposited in the land title office”. A sketch plan does not have to be prepared by a British Columbia land surveyor. See s. 99(3) of the Land Title Act.

Special Survey

For a defined area, the Attorney General may order a British Columbia land surveyor approved by the Surveyor General to make a ground survey so as to redefine the area’s boundaries. See Part 23 of the Land Title Act.

Statutory Right of Way Plan

A statutory right of way plan is a plan based on a ground survey that defines the area over which there is a statutory right of way. The plan shows the boundaries of existing subdivided parcels within the area. It is prepared by a British Columbia land surveyor and deposited under s. 113 of the Act. See ss. 113, 114, and 116 of the Land Title Act.

Subdivision Plan

A subdivision plan is based on a ground survey and creates new parcels for which the registrar registers title. A British Columbia land surveyor prepares a subdivision plan. See s. 67 of the Land Title Act.